Convention Workshops

Convention Workshops

Enhance your CEC 2019 professional development experience with a workshop focusing on important topics. Earn Professional Development Hours (PDHs) too!

CEC 2019 will offer both full-day workshops (9 a.m.–4 p.m., 6 PDHs) and half-day workshops (9 a.m.–12 p.m. or 1–4 p.m., 3 PDHs) on Wednesday, January 30 and Saturday, February 2. Convention workshops are special ticketed items and are not included as a part of a standard convention registration. Additional fees for convention workshops apply—please see the registration page for convention workshop rates.

Wednesday, January 30 – Full Day – 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Wednesday, January 30 – Half Day – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Wednesday, January 30 – Half Day – 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Saturday, February 2 – Half Day – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Wednesday, January 30 – Full day– 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Workshop 01—Building a Solid Foundation for Inclusive Practices: Improving Outcomes for All Students
Presented in partnership with the Indiana IEP Resource Center and Indiana State University

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leaders: George Batsche, Ed.D., University of South Florida, Tampa; Susan Hentz, Susan Hentz and Associates, Sarasota, FLTerrance Scott, Ph.D., University of Louisville, KY

In this workshop, you will learn the essential components of inclusive education including core beliefs and the importance of culture and climate. Within inclusive environments, districts must consider service delivery models, instructional practices, and classroom management to meet the needs of all learners. Resources including staff, materials, and facilities must be allocated to design a better person-environment fit and to remove barriers to inclusion. Instruction must engage learners with varying abilities and interest. The integration of Specially Designed Instruction (SDI) is required. Students must be taught the expectations of the classroom and teachers must have a toolbox of strategies to prevent and respond to student behavior. But how does this all happen? This session will provide information and practical strategies to assist district and building level teams to develop a strong foundation for inclusive practices in order to improve outcomes for all learners.

Participants who attend this workshop will have the opportunity to extend their learning throughout the conference via associated CEC Sessions and Networking Roundtables. In addition, educators are encouraged to participate in Virtual Sharing and Learning Communities following the conference.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Understand essential components for successful implementation of inclusive practices.
  • Learn potential service delivery models for appropriating resources in order to meet the needs of all learners.
  • Learn effective strategies for engaging a variety of learners.
  • Define specially designed instruction across settings.
  • Learn about resources and strategies to prevent and respond to the behavioral needs of learners.

Workshop 02—Applied Improvisation to Support Social/Emotional, and Academic Learning of Students with Disabilities

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Jim Ansaldo, Ph.D., Indiana Institute on Disability and Community, Indiana University, Bloomington

Improvisation is a key method in many theater programs, offers K-12 schools flexible, low-cost ways to embed theater across the curriculum, and represents a strategy for integrating arts, academic, social, and emotional learning. Consistent with the practices of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), improvisation offers educators strategies to provide multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement. As a flexible art form, improvisation aligns with techniques for creating appropriate challenge for students with disabilities, including instructional scaffolding and task analysis. This workshop focuses on improvisational theater as a means of strengthening arts education and integration, deepening engagement, and increasing academic achievement for students with disabilities.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for using improv as a means of integrating arts, academic, and social/emotional learning for students with disabilities.
  • Describe ways that improv facilitates a “three-tiered” approach to supporting students with disabilities.
  • Demonstrate a variety of improv exercises that can be used to facilitate arts, academic, and social/emotional learning of students with disabilities.
  • Demonstrate the use of instructional scaffolding and task analysis in order to create appropriate challenge in improv activities for students with disabilities.

Workshop 03—Do’s and Don’ts for the Effective Utilization of Paraprofessionals

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Ritu V. Chopra, Ph.D., The Paraprofessional Resource and Research Center, University of Colorado—Denver

Paraprofessionals deliver an array of special education services with little or no formal preparation for their duties. Additionally, they often work with teachers and licensed professionals who are legally and ethically responsible for directing the paraprofessionals’ work but typically do not have preparation for their supervisory role. As a result, paraprofessionals are often not effectively utilized with students with disabilities. In this interactive workshop, the presenter will share research based paraprofessional supervision content, tools, and resources that can used by special and general education teachers and administrators to appropriately guide and direct the work of paraprofessionals.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of the revised CEC paraprofessional standards and their implications in terms of supervision of paraprofessionals.
  • Learn the research-based components/content/tools related to paraprofessional supervision that needs to be delivered to teacher candidates and teachers.
  • Engage in a dialog how the paraprofessional supervision content can be integrated in to teacher preparation programs and inservice professional development for teachers.

Workshop 04—Crying Kids Can’t Learn to Read: Integrating Socio-emotional Learning in Your Curriculum

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader:Diana Kennedy, MindSpark, San Anselmo, CA

Are your students too stressed or too upset or too [insert emotion here] to learn? Stress, sadness, shame and other negative emotions decrease the receptiveness of brains to learning. How can you support the emotional life of your students and still meet rigorous academic demands? Learn about the neurobiology of stress and attachment teaching. Discover the power gained from attending to students’ socio-emotional needs. Explore a framework for integrating socio-emotional responsiveness into the curriculum and head home with practical examples of lessons that integrate socio-emotional attunement with academic goals.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Explain attachment teaching and why it is important for student learning.
  • Explain the neurobiology behind negative emotions and how they impede learning.
  • Integrate attuned responses to students’ socio-emotional needs with academic lessons.
  • Apply a framework in order to prepare for predictable and unpredictable stressors in your student’s lives

Workshop 05—Tier 2 and Tier 3 Behavior Support: Developing Protocols and Implementation Plans

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leaders:Randy Sprick, Ph.D., and Jessica Sprick, Safe & Civil Schools, Eugene, OR

This workshop presents a multi-tier approach to behavior support that ensures that the easiest, and least staff-intrusive interventions are tried first, only progressing to more complex and staff-intensive interventions if needed. The first layer of this continuum is early-stage interventions, designed and implemented by general educations teachers. Next, a menu of Tier 2 problem-solving processes and interventions will be provided—again with the goal that the easiest and least intrusive intervention is implemented with fidelity. Lastly, Tier 3 problem-solving processes will be described and a simple function-based planning tool will be provided. Participants will evaluate the current array of Tier 2/3 supports in their school, identify gaps in that array, and develop an action plan for closing any gaps that currently exist.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Assess the quality of Tier 2 and 3 current problem-solving processes and identify any weaknesses or gaps.
  • Identify a menu of early-stage and ready-to implement Tier 2 interventions.
  • Develop an action plan for implementing/refining Tier 2 and 3 processes and procedures.

Workshop 06—Beyond Paper & Pencil: Simple Strategies to Activate Your Students’ Brains

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Susan Quam Weinstein, Southern Berkshire Regional School District, Sheffield, MA

Simple strategies and understandings when properly instituted can activate students’ brains, increasing their motivation and learning and change their social/emotional state of being bringing organization, order, excitement and even fun back to the classroom experience. In this full-day workshop you will learn: how the mind and body are connected and why higher levels of thinking are a consequence of increasing the function of that connection; how to reach and activate specific brain areas to accommodate different types of learners within the same classroom environment; why behavior and learning are linked together and how your behaviors are creating roadblocks in your students’ learning; practical tools you can use to enhance and maximize learning while addressing unwanted behaviors; and how to create your own unique brain-based learning strategies that work.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • •Understand and describe how the body and mind work together.
  • Recognize the link between behavior and learning and identify how your behaviors as a teacher are affecting your students’ learning.
  • Identify and demonstrate how to reach and activate the area of the brain that has the biggest affect on learning and behavior.
  • Create your own unique brain-based learning strategies.

Workshop 07—Critical Issues in Secondary Transition Service Delivery

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Donna Wandry, Ph.D.West Chester University, PA

This workshop will address critical aspects affecting appropriate and mandate-correct actions in the provision of secondary transition services. Dr. Wandry will present best practices in transition assessment, IEP planning, and curriculum alignment. Further discussion will focus on the systemic challenges of engaging in those best practices and their impact on effective transition service provision as outlined by IDEA and reflected via SPP Indicators 13 and 14.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Acquire new or enhanced information regarding secondary transition services as mandated under IDEA.
  • Articulate possible solutions and create a plan for addressing LEA-based challenges in transition service provision.
  • Understand support resources available to you in addressing your LEA-based challenges in transition service provision.
  • Use case-based venues to craft legally sound transition assessment, IEP planning, and program delivery.

Workshop 08—Developing Legally Defensible IEPs

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Julie J. Weatherly, Esq., Resolutions in Special Education, Inc., Mobile, AL

The U.S. Supreme Court has recently referred to the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as the “centerpiece” of the IDEA’s education delivery system for students with disabilities. In accordance with the Court’s updated two-pronged test for determining whether an IEP is appropriate, hearing officers and courts will look to both the procedural and substantive components of the IEP. Let’s examine many common pitfalls that educators must avoid–both procedurally and substantively–in an effort to ensure that IEPs are legally defensible.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Recognize common procedural and substantive mistakes made in the development of IEPs that have significant legal implications.
  • Participate appropriately in IEP meetings.
  • Facilitate IEP team members and meetings in a way that will assist in avoiding legal disputes.

Workshop 09—CEC Program Recognition Report Reviewer Workshop

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Christy Hooser, Ph.D., Eastern Illinois University, Charleston

This workshop is offered at no cost for approved applicants. Information and the application can be found at www.cec.sped.org/programreviewer.
Principles for and examples of performance-based program review, and strategies for reviewing reports and for successfully writing the sections of the CEC Program Recognition Review will be discussed.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Explain the steps and components in reviewing a CEC Preparation Program Recognition Report.
  • Ensure that program assessments align with the major elements of the CEC Preparation Standards.

Workshop 10—CEC Program Recognition Report Developer Workshop

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Joni Baldwin, Ed.D., University of Dayton, OH

In this interactive workshop, you will learn the components of CEC Preparation Program Recognition Reports. All participants will receive CEC program developer resources. You will come away better prepared to develop program performance-based assessments, align them with the CEC content standards, and prepare the final program report.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Describe the CEC program recognition report process and list its essential elements.
  • Develop program performance-based assessments and align them with the CEC Preparation Standards.
  • Develop the program report.

Wednesday, January 30 – Half Day – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Workshop 11—Creating Resilient Minds: Body/Mind Connections, Identity and Disability

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Lynn Knight, Ph.D., Colorado State University—Pueblo

In this workshop, you will travel on a journey from different fields of study to discover how to listen and use body information to increase resiliency in your mind and support your students to do the same. This workshop will be lecture intertwined with body/mind work to support a variety of ways your body and brain can recover from internal and external stressors. Learn tools and hands-on, bodywork movements to support yourself and your students to be more body/mind aware when dealing with issues related to emotional/physical trauma, identity issues and/or academic stress. Learn how to move and process emotions through the body with school appropriate techniques, and a variety of ways the body and brain can recover from emotional and physical trauma.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Process and move emotions through the mind and body.
  • Build resiliency to trauma in the mind and body.
  • Discover more information about how the body and mind work together.

Workshop 12—Executive Function Training For Elementary Students: A Model for Explicit Instruction

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leaders: Roberta Strosnider, Ph.D., Towson University, MD and Val Sharpe, Ph.D., Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD

This workshop focuses on improving elementary students’ executive function skills while considering Universal Design for Learning Principles and metacognition. Elementary general and special Education teachers will learn steps that guide instruction from the choice of executive functions a student will benefit from learning to the student’s learning and generalizing helpful strategies to improve his or her executive functioning. You will be engaged in classroom-based activities and leave with strategies and supportive technology they can use in their classrooms immediately.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Describe a rationale for improving elementary students’ executive functions.
  • Describe an explicit process for improving executive function skills.
  • Consider Universal Design for Learning and metacognition to identify and teach supportive strategies for students having difficulties with executive functioning.
  • Develop an instructional plan that can be initiated with your students to improve executive functioning.

Workshop 13—Common Co-Teaching Challenges: There Are Ways to Address Them

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Marilyn FriendUniversity of North Carolina at Greensboro

No doubt about it—co-teaching is complex. And sometimes its challenges can interfere with its effectiveness. This workshop is designed for professionals grappling with dilemmas such as these: Which students are good candidates for co-teaching? For how long should a co-teaching last? What are ways to realistically schedule co-teaching, especially with limited staff? How can we arrange planning time for co-teachers? How can we move practice away from one teaching and one assisting? What if students are not achieving as expected in co-teaching? Of course, additional questions and concerns from participants will be added to the workshop agenda.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Problem solve on issues related to students in co-taught classes (which students with disabilities, who else, how many).
  • Apply strategies to address the time and scheduling constraints of co-teaching (e.g., duration of co-teaching sessions, options for planning time).
  • Analyze challenges related to professional practice (e.g., deciding the number of years for partnerships, reducing one teaching and one assisting, avoiding stagnant student achievement).

Workshop 14—Assessing the Needs of Staff Through Strategic Conversations

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Nichole E. Moore, Ed.S., Exceptional Voices Consulting, LLC, Plymouth, MI

Providing timely and continuous feedback is essential for building capacity/skilled staff. Administrators must assess and understand the primary needs of the individuals they supervise. Providing the best conversational approach will support staff in improving their delivery of specially designed instruction and demonstrating ongoing professional growth. In this session, participants will 1) develop an understanding of the skill vs. will continuum 2) identify the 4 types of strategic conversations and how these coaching conversations impact student success one conversation at a time and 3) develop a leadership action plan that will support administrators in providing timely and targeted feedback.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of the skill vs. will continuum and the characteristics of each quadrant.
  • Identify the 4 types of strategic conversations and how these coaching conversations impact student success one conversation at a time.
  • Develop a leadership Action Plan that will support administrators in providing timely and targeted feedback.

Workshop 15—Early Intervention: What Every Teacher Must Know and Be Able to Do

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Karina Soto, School Board of Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, FL

Early Intervention is critical when attempting to run effective early learning programs. In this workshop, you will discuss the “must know” elements that new and seasoned teachers must be aware of in order to assist the population the serve appropriately. You will engage in hands-on, interactive activities to practice how to gather data effectively using tools you can develop and share with peers in early childhood programs, parents and stakeholders. You will discuss screening tools, determine if further assessments are needed, analyze data collected to guide instruction, review effective educational/behavior-change strategies, and develop individualized, educational/behavior-based interventions for children in your classroom.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Identify and apply at least three (3) data collection tools and their use toward implementation of educational/behavior-based interventions.
  • Examine effective strategies toward the determination of further assessments based on screening data.
  • Evaluate and interpret data to develop individualized educational/behavior-based interventions.
  • Apply and use objective language when collecting data toward the development of effective educational/behavior intervention plans.

Workshop 16—Let Me Hear Your Voice! Teacher Input and Evidence-Based Practice

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leaders: Susan M. Wilczynski and Amanda Henderson, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

Evidence-based practice involves selecting interventions based on the best available evidence, client values/preferences, and professional judgment. Research participants often differ significantly from students; research conditions differ dramatically from schools. For this reason, selecting an intervention exclusively based on “evidence” may yield an ineffective treatment. This workshop addresses the need for teacher input when interventions are selected. Teachers are uniquely able to identify which interventions are likely to be implemented with a high degree of procedural accuracy. This workshop shows you how to have your voice more effectively heard with both internal and external consultants. Examples will include students with ASD.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Describe the evidence-based practice decision-making model that includes your input.
  • Recommend treatment acceptability tools to consultants to ensure your views are being adequately considered.
  • Advocate for interventions that are both effective and preferred to your students.
  • Advocate more effectively for interventions that both work and meet the needs of the setting.

Workshop 17—What All Educators Must Know About Coming Changes to Special Education and Early Intervention Policy

Wednesday, January 30, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Deborah Ziegler, Ed.D., Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA

In this wide-ranging session, CEC’s Policy and Advocacy Director and presenters will analyze education policies currently under discussion in Washington, DC, review the recent changes to education and early intervention policies supported by the Administration and Congress, and examine their impact on children and youth with disabilities and/or gifts and talents.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Identify and discuss key special/gifted education and early intervention policy issues currently under consideration by the White House and U.S. Congress.
  • Discuss CEC’s recommendations and positions on key policy issues.

Wednesday, January 30 – Half Day – 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Workshop 18—Administrators & Mentors: Enhancing the Success of New Special Education Teachers

Wednesday, January 30, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leaders: Catherine Creighton Martin, Ph.D. and Clara Hauth, Ph.D., Marymount University, Arlington, VA

This session is designed for administrators and mentors of new special education teachers. Materials to support them will be discussed and include; clearly defined roles & responsibilities, creating a culture of collaboration and the development of skills to create and schedule time and build relationships with your new teachers. The materials of the workshop are based on the contents and research behind the book, “A Principal’s Guide to Special Education,” Third Edition, published by CEC.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Integrate resources from the “Survival Guide for Special Education Teachers” and other sources into new teacher induction programs.
  • Use creative strategies to improve mentoring programs.
  • Identify universal challenges faced by special education teachers and strategies to overcome them.
  • Employ strategies to enhance new educators’ performance.

Workshop 19—From Start to Finish: Implementing Specially Designed Instruction in a Co-Taught Class

Wednesday, January 30, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Marilyn Friend, Ph.D., University of North Carolina—Charlotte

Many professionals understand that co-teaching must include the provision of specially designed instruction for students with disabilities. However, they often express skepticism of how this can actually occur and frustration in meeting this co-teaching expectation. This workshop is a roll-up-your-sleeves session intended to demonstrate how to implement SDI in the co-taught classroom, from looking at individual student needs, through selecting SDI, to integrating that SDI into the general instruction, to measuring its effectiveness.

After completing this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Analyze the IEPs of several students in a co-taught class to identify shared and unique instructional needs select appropriate specially designed instruction for them.
  • Map specially designed instruction onto daily lesson plans.
  • Use co-teaching approaches to successfully deliver SDI in co-teaching.
  • Gather data to document and demonstrate progress in learning from SDI.

Workshop 20—Arts Integration: Strategies for Inclusion and Differentiated Instruction

Wednesday, January 30, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leaders: Katherine Koch, Ph.D. and Janna Chevon Thompson, Ph.D., St. Mary’s College of Maryland

This session is designed to provide a workshop-style experience in arts integration, allowing participants to experience arts integrated model lessons. The workshop will emphasize understanding the philosophy behind and integrating the arts in teaching and learning with children, and examines strategies, materials, and experiences in visual arts, music, drama, and dance for children with exceptionalities from Pre-K-12. You will have the opportunity to share and extend on the arts integration lessons and/or concepts for use in your classrooms. Time will be allotted to share ideas on what would work best in their classrooms as well as create new activities and/or extending on existing concepts. You are encouraged to bring a computer/tablet and lesson plans/units into which you would like to incorporate the arts.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Understand philosophy of arts integration and how it can be utilized to enhance student engagement and behavior in the classroom.
  • Articulate how arts integration can address the needs of a wide-spectrum of learner styles including students receiving special education services.
  • Demonstrate how arts integration can be crafted to facilitate the implementation of assessment.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how the arts can be a teaching tool across the curriculum, addressing a range of learning styles, interests, experiences, and abilities.

Workshop 21—Digital Learning: Tech Tools, Strategies, & Tips to Personalize Learning

Wednesday, January 30, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leaders: Sean J. Smith, Ph.D., University of Kansas, Lawrence and Kavita Rao, Ph.D., University of Hawai’i at Manoa

Digital learning environments abound. Be it a blended learning environment or a 1-to-1 device initiative, technology is permeating today’s classroom. Innovations are altering what is possible in the instructional lives of struggling learners and their peers with disabilities. This workshop will feature tech-based solutions integrated with proven instructional practices to foster enhanced learning opportunities and outcomes. You will learn to integrate technology, aligned with the Universal Design for Learning Framework. You will leave with a toolbox full of technology suggestions along with ideas to implement that further personalizes the learning experience for students at the margins and in most need of supports.

After completing this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Identify technology-based solutions that when applied, will enhance learner instructional, behavioral, and social emotional outcomes.
  • Understand ways to integrate tech innovations that, when combined with effective interventions, will enhance the learning experience designing to address barriers and facilitate further student engagement.
  • Leave with technology-based tools but also ways to apply these tools in a meaningful way to enhance inclusionary experiences.
  • Explore ways to re-design your instructional setting empowering learners to further personalize the learning experience to meet the diverse learning needs of students.

Workshop 22—Understanding Students with Mental Health Needs: Strategies and Supports for Educators and Families

Wednesday, January 30, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leader: Mickey VanDerwerker, Virginia Department of Education Training and Technical Assistance Center at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg

In this workshop, the presenter will introduce and define specific mental health diagnoses and what these diagnoses entail with a focus on anxiety disorders, mood disorders, OCD, and PTSD/trauma. For each disorder, you will engage in activities to help you understand what the student is experiencing and what strategies and supports have been found effective in school and in the student’s life. You’ll be directed to resources for more information there will be time for Q&A at the end.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Define or describe mental health disorders (anxiety disorders, mood disorders, OCD, PTSD/trauma, and tic disorders) as they affect students.
  • Identify strategies to address issues related to these disorders.
  • Find additional reliable, research-based information about these disorders after the session.

Workshop 23—Executive Function Training For Secondary Students: A Model for Explicit Instruction

Wednesday, January 30, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Leaders: Roberta Strosnider, Ph.D., Towson University, MD and Val Sharpe, Ph.D., Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD

This workshop focuses on improving secondary students’ executive function skills while considering Universal Design for Learning Principles and metacognition. Secondary general and special education teachers will learn steps that guide instruction from the choice of executive functions a student will benefit from learning to the student’s learning and generalizing helpful strategies to improve his or her executive functioning. You will be engaged in classroom-based activities and leave with strategies and supportive technology they can use in their classrooms immediately.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Describe a rationale for improving secondary students’ executive functions.
  • Describe an explicit process for improving executive function skills.
  • Consider Universal Design for Learning and metacognition to identify and teach supportive strategies for students having difficulties with executive functioning.
  • Develop an instructional plan that can be initiated with your students to improve executive functioning.

Saturday, February 2 – Half Day – 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Workshop 24—When Life Hands You Data, Make Data-Based Decisions!

Saturday, February 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leaders: Tessie Bailey, Ph.D., and Teri Marx, Ph.D., American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC

Are you struggling with setting realistic yet meaningful goals for your students while still ensuring alignment to standards? This session, intended for special educators in K-8 settings, will introduce participants to the National Center on Intensive Intervention’s as a mechanism for providing specially designed instruction: data-based individualization (DBI). In this interactive workshop highlighting FREE resources, participants will learn how to use DBI to set individualized, standards-aligned goals for students; design individualized instruction; improve and simplify individual education program (IEP) writing; and identify strategies for improving student outcomes.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Use data from the data-based individualization process to design individualized, specialized instruction and evaluate progress.
  • Use progress monitoring data to write realistic intervention and IEP goals using a variety of goal-setting strategies across academics and behavior.
  • Access a variety of tools and resources to better understand how to intensify interventions based on student data.

Workshop 25—Relating in the Classroom: Evidence-Based Strategies for Teacher-Paraeducator Collaboration

Saturday, February 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leaders: Tia N. Barnes, Ph.D., University of Delaware, Newark and Christina Cipriano, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts—Dartmouth

Effective collaboration among classroom personnel can improve achievement for students with disabilities. Unfortunately, few pre-service or in-service opportunities are available to provide support in forming and maintaining effective teacher-paraeducator teams. The materials of the workshop are based on the contents and research of the Recognizing Excellence in Learning and Teaching (RELATE) Project, a multi-year comprehensive investigation of special education classroom environments. Using an interactive approach, you will be provided with strategies for strengthening collaborative relationships and overcoming challenges to effective teacher-paraeducator collaboration in these settings.

After completing this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Explain the practical significance of effective teacher-paraeducator collaboration.
  • Describe barriers to effective teacher-paraeducator collaboration.
  • Utilize evidence-based practices to optimize teacher-paraeducator collaboration in your classroom.
  • Demonstrate skills in using interactive activities to foster teacher-paraeducator collaboration.

Workshop 26—Practical Program Design for Behavioral Classrooms: Addressing Intensive Behavioral Needs

Saturday, February 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leaders: Tricia Berg and Jessica Sprick, Safe & Civil Schools, Eugene, OR

In this workshop, the leaders will present best-practice strategies for building a positive and proactive self-contained special education classroom for students with intensive behavioral needs. You will engage in a variety of activities to build an environment that increases engagement, improves student outcomes (behavioral and academic), integrates evidence-based practices, and promotes generalizability of skills to less restrictive environments. You will work with presenters to develop a specific action plan for applying these strategies in their own classrooms.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Identify structural variables you can manipulate (e.g., physical layout, clarity of classroom rules and expectations, point cards/level systems, etc.) to set the stage for appropriate behavior and how to modify these variables when chronic behavioral issues arise.
  • Identify the critical components for teaching behavioral, social-emotional, and academic skills in a behavioral class setting, and how to provide for generalization to less restrictive environments.
  • Select practical strategies you can implement immediately to achieve positive ratios of interaction with students, including methods for collecting data, reinforcement systems, and strategies and systems for providing fluent corrections and effective corrections.
  • Design an action plan with strategies you can implement immediately to address specific concerns occurring in the classroom this year, and outline a secondary action plan for work you will do to prepare your classroom for the fall.

Workshop 27—Grade Level Problem Solving for Behavior

Saturday, February 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leaders: Stephanie Dyer and Melissa Nantais, Ph.D., Michigan’s Integrated Behavior & Learning Support Initiative (MIBLSI), Lansing

This interactive session equips you to run an effective grade level team meeting using behavior data resulting in a specific action plan to address precise problem statements based on the data. You will deepen their understanding of behavior science, analyze behavioral data, and apply a framework of prevention, teaching, and responding to develop grade-level and classroom-level plans for addressing behavior.

After this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Run an effective grade level team meeting using behavior data resulting in a specific action plan to address the precise problem statement based on the data.
  • Read and interpret grade level behavior data to support grade level team meetings.
  • Apply a prevent, teach, respond framework to the development of grade level plans for addressing behavior.

Workshop 28—Inclusion is More Than “Just Being In:” Strategies for Valued Membership and Full Participation of Students with Complex Support Needs

Saturday, February 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Cheryl M. Jorgensen, Ph.D., Cheryl M. Jorgensen Educational Consulting, Durham, NH

In this workshop, you will view examples of three students (elementary, middle, and high school) with complex support needs who were successfully included in general education instruction in heterogeneous general education classes. You will learn to identify observable indicators of authentic membership and participation and practice developing participation and learning support plans for students with complex support needs. In addition, you will learn strategies for embedding special education and related services supports into general education instructional routines.

After completing this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Cite the research- and values-based rationale for inclusive education.
  • List the observable indicators of membership, participation, and reciprocal social relationships.
  • Complete a general education lesson/unit participation plan for a student with complex support needs such as autism, intellectual disability, or multiple disabilities.
  • Give examples of how special educators, SLPs, and OTs can provide support to students within general education lessons.

Workshop 29—From Chaos to Clarity: Structuring Classrooms to Improve Student Engagement and Achievement

Saturday, February 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Sarah K. Smith, Easterseals Chicagoland and Rockford, IL

Even with exemplary instruction, interventions, and curriculum supports, students with autism learn best when the classroom environment is systematically prepared with their needs in mind. This interactive workshop will provide participants with essential strategies that help structure optimal learning environments to support not only the needs of learners with autism, but also the learning needs and engagement of all students. Creative ideas for setting up the environment to foster success, using visual supports to promote independence, and developing routines to build predictability will provide both experienced and novice educators with practical solutions they can implement in their classrooms.

After completing this workshop, you will be able to:

  • • Identify characteristics of systematically-prepared and visually-organized learning environments.
  • Implement evidence-based strategies for designing classrooms that support students with autism.
  • Develop structured lesson routines to promote independence, self-efficacy, and success.

Workshop 30—The ABCs of Learning Issues

Saturday, February 2, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Leader: Dana Stahl, Educational Alternatives LLC, Katonah, NY

This workshop is designed to familiarize you with various learning issues and to gain insight into typical student behaviors. You will deepen their skill set by obtaining greater clarity of your students’ individual profiles while expanding your ability to incorporate effective teaching strategies. The book, BOXES (Better Organization and Xplanations of Exceptional Students), a rubric for differentiated instruction and a reference tool for educators and paraprofessionals, will be introduced. You will develop a common language bridging the gap between the school and home by demystifying areas of concerns educators observe in school and parents witness at home.

After completing this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Describe the association between learning issues and behaviors often identified in formal evaluations.
  • Understand how learning issues correlate with specific classroom behaviors and develop a common language with parents.
  • Evaluate a student’s profile, analyzing that student from an academic, social and emotional perspective, and engage in a discussion about which educational program model suits students best.